The Hidden Power of Moral Focus

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We accomplish so much more when we keep our moral commitments at the heart of what we do. That surplus shows up as greater impact, more trust, and warmer connections rather than the endless “more, more, more” of marketing content.

Moral focus means asking ourselves:

  • Whom is this for and what do I stand for?
  • Why am I choosing to be present at this time, in this medium, on this topic?
  • What kind of better can I imagine by bringing this work to the world?

Moral focus means asking those questions, again and again, every time we publish or distribute a message — every page, every line, every word with a clear line of sight to its purpose.

But moral focus is not to be confused with moral certainty (which is a common source of error, if not outright cruelty). Instead, it’s a form of inquiry. We have to keep asking.

The practice of moral focus is grounded in the notion that better is always possible in our little corner of the world. When we have an idea, when we innovate, we become fixated on the kind of better that is on the other side of it.

In turn, that vision uplifts and empowers how we communicate what’s new. We commit to helping people know more, think more clearly, make better decisions, strive higher to create better in their little corner of the world.